Open peer review: What do reviewers think?

It’s the second year of Peer Review Week and in 2016 the theme is Recognition for Review. Our aim in marking the week is to explore the various aspects of how those who spent time on review should be recognised for their contribution. We believe we go further than many to recognise our reviewers; indeed […]

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Opening up to truly realise the value of peer review

Peer review. What’s left that has not already been said about peer review? It’s the best system we have. It’s flawed. All of the research community spend time and energy doing it, in the belief that they are contributing to their chosen field. Here at F1000, one of our objectives is to clean up the […]

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Moving to opportunity? Challenging an analysis of poverty, opportunity and PTSD.

A guest blog by David C. Norris, who together with Andrew Wilson recently published ‘Early-childhood housing mobility and subsequent PTSD in adolescence: a Moving to Opportunity reanalysis’ in our Preclinical Reproducibility and Robustness channel.     In the 1990s, Congress mandated the ‘Moving To Opportunity for Fair Housing Demonstration’ (MTO)—a randomized, controlled […]

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Guidelines for software good practices

A guest post by Manuel Corpas, Scientific Lead at Repositive, formerly of The Earlham Institute & ELIXIR-UK.  We all recognise the fact that good practices when developing code are a positive thing. But when reality hits home, the rush of moving on to something else strikes or simply when the all too common procrastination thought “I […]

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An Advisory Board, a STAP replication attempt and mislabelling of gene expression samples

It has been half a year since the Preclinical Reproducibility & Robustness (PRR) channel was launched. PRR provides a venue for researchers to publish both confirmatory and non-confirmatory studies to help improve reproducibility of results, mitigate publication bias towards positive results and to promote open dialogue between scientists. A number of invaluable replication attempts […]

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Feeling blue: addressing challenges in color perception research

Guest post by Alex Holcombe, Nicholas Brown, Patrick Goodbourn, Alexander Etz and Sebastian Geukes A study published by Christopher Thorstenson, Adam Pazda, and Andrew Elliot in Psychological Science in August 2015 suggested that sadness impairs color perception, based on two experiments they conducted. Almost as soon as it was published, many people pointed out problems […]

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